Partisan Notes – June 24th

Play – Instructor’s Version

  1. Both start in a normal guard with the left hand and foot forward.
  2. The agent feint’s to the head from the patient’s right side with an increase of the foot. [Punta Portata]
  3. The patient parry’s to his inside, that being the right side.
  4. The agent disengages by turning under while slightly contracting.
  5. With an increase of the foot, the agent strikes at the neck on the patient’s left side. [Punta Portata]

This fits well with Marozzo’s emphasis on alternating expansion and contraction.

In step 5, you attack the neck instead of the head because it is much harder to defend. The partisan is almost level with the opponent’s front hand, taking away his ability to parry solely with angles.

Play Variants – Official

If the patient doesn’t parry, the feint becomes a committed attack and he is struck in the head.

If the agent cannot reach the neck, the left should is also a viable target.

Play – My Interpretation

I do not have access to the translation at this time, so I’m just going off of gut instinct. That said, it seems to flow better and gives the patient no time to react.

  1. Both start in a normal guard with the left hand and foot forward.
  2. The agent feint’s to the head from the patient’s right side with an increase of the foot. [Punta Portata]
  3. The patient parry’s to his inside, that being the right side.
  4. The agent disengages by turning under while continuing the attack towards the neck on the patient’s left side.

For this to work you have to be at a very long measure. If you are too close, there won’t be time to disengage. When that happens, contract the body as shown in the first version to buy time and distance.

Invented Play

As a class exercise, we invented this play.

  1. Both start in a normal guard with the left hand and foot forward.
  2. The agent feints to the head from the patient’s right side with an increase of the foot. [Punta Portata]
  3. The patient parry’s to his inside, that being the right side.
  4. The agent disengages by turning under.
  5. While passing back and exchanging hands,, the agent throws a blow at the patient’s forearm. [Punta Cambiata]

This keeps with the Marozzo’s partisan style, which is to retreat with a parting shot after each exchange.

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