Meyer’s Dusak – Introduction

Part two of Meyer’s The Art of Combat covers the dusak. This chapter is intended to not only train the student on the dusak itself, but to also prepare them for future work with the rapier.

Rather than a proper introduction as was found in the section on the longsword, part two has a poem much like the merk verse of Lichtenauer. What follows is the poem along with my interpretation of it.

With the weapon extend far and long, hang over forward after the cut.

Many of the images show what appears to be a hanging guard or what an Italian would call prima (first).

With your body step far as well; send in your cuts powerfully around him.

To all four targets let them fly; with comportment and pulling you can deceive him.

The four targets refer to the four divisions of the opponent. Being a small weapon, dusak can be quickly turned to attack any target.

Need to look up the definition of “comportment” and “pulling”.

You shall parry in the forte, and meanwhile injure him with the foible.

Like most swords, the dusak’s blade is divided into a weak and a strong section. Presumably he is expecting parries to occur roughly a third of the way up from the hilt and cuts a third of the way down from the point.

Also you shall come no nearer than where you can reach him with a step.

When he is about to run in at you, the point drives him from you.

If you can touch him with your hand without taking a large step you are way too close. Keep you opponent at a distance using to point as a deterrent from rushing in.

But if he has run in on you, with gripping and wrestling you shall be the first.

If he does close, grab him and drop him to the ground before he has a chance to do the same.

Pay heed to the forte and fobile, “Instantly” makes the openings apparent.

Also step correctly in the Before and After; watch diligently for the right time, and do not let yourself be easily unnerved.

Before and after refer to timing and being active or reactive. Keep cool and don’t let the opponent force your hand. (In general the German’s prefer to be the active participant, always keeping the opponent in a reactionary mode.)

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Dusak, Meyer and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Meyer’s Dusak – Introduction

  1. Grauenwolf says:

    From Lot:

    >Many of the images show what appears to be a hanging guard or what an
    >Italian would call prima (first).

    This is a really interesting read on the text. I always read this as a leaning of the body behind the cut. More of a body hanging than a sword, but I can see where it could be read as turning over of the weapon as a recovering action.

    >> With your body step far as well; send in your cuts powerfully around him.
    >> To all four targets let them fly; with comportment and pulling you can deceive him.
    >
    >The four targets refer to the four divisions of the opponent. Being a
    >small weapon, dusak can be quickly turned to attack any target.
    >
    >Need to look up the definition of “comportment” and “pulling”.
    >

    Meyer talks about comportment of the body a lot in his text. I read it as how you stand and act during your actions that can be read by your opponent. i.e. I look fierce and like I am about to throw a really powerful cut and then I make a quick change and thrust. Pulling generally refers to actions that are changed midway through. i.e. I throw a cut from right to left and midway through I change the cut and come back and throw left to right. These are both fundamental to deceiving the opponent.

    >> Pay heed to the forte and fobile, “Instantly” makes the openings apparent.
    >> Also step correctly in the Before and After; watch diligently for the right time, and do not let yourself be easily unnerved.
    >

    “Instantly” refers the the German concept of “Indes” – the moment of decision where the fight changes after the initial engagement. This is a really interesting concept.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s