Meyer’s Longsword – Guards Part 1 of 4

Ochs – Ox [Master Guard]

Meyer divides the Ochs or Ox into three guards. The primary form of Ochs has the tip lowered towards the face. The short-edge is up, but not completely vertical. The feet are opposite the blade; that is to say if the blade is on the right then the left foot is forward and if the blade is on the left, the right foot is forward. The arms will be crossed for a right-handed fencer when using Ox on the right.

Ox is one of the five Master Guards and with good reason. It is hard for the opponent to judge the distance because the blade is well hidden; when properly aimed all they see is the point in their face and the quillons of the hilt. The body is wound cut for either a thrust or a long-edge cut, and either can be turned into the other mid-attack.

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Ochs does give the appearance that the legs are open for attack. But our good friend Capoferro has something to say on that.

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The laws of angulation apply equally well to the longsword as they do the rapier.

Hangort – Hanging Point

As you can see, Hanging Point is essentially Ox with the point lowered to about the hips. The arms are pushed forward to allow this to occur and the feet continue to oppose the blade.

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Einhorn – Unicorn

Einhorn is Ochs with the point raised instead of lowered.

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4 Responses to Meyer’s Longsword – Guards Part 1 of 4

  1. Grauenwolf says:

    According to Meyer the picture of Hangort is flawed and the arms should be extended further.

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