Monthly Archives: October 2014

Meyer’s Longsword – More Thoughts on the Kurtzhau or Short Cut

This is useful against someone who understands the Krumphau and doesn’t throw his whole body into the initial attack. Imagine someone who fights in True Time, which is to say he starts his cuts with just the arms and then, … Continue reading

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Meyer’s Longsword – Another Device for Tag (part 1)

There is a lot going on in this device, so I don’t want to rush through it. This device is different than the ones we’ve seen before. So much so that Meyer writes of it, This is indeed quite a … Continue reading

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Meyer’s Longsword – Device 4, Breaking Tag

Nearly everyone who has picked up a longsword has heard about the neigh mythical vier versetzen and how a Zwerch can easily break vom Tag. The problem is, there is nothing in the Liechtenauer tradition that tell us how to … Continue reading

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Meyer’s Longsword – Third Device for Tag

In the second device we looked at the parry against a rising attack on the left, today we look at the rising cut on the right. Initial Parry: Krump No real change here. The attack is against your right, so … Continue reading

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Meyer’s Longsword – Second Device for Tag

Meyer’s first device was a counter to attacks from above. This is the most basic attack from Tag, and the most easily countered. So students of Meyer will often start with a rising cut from Tag to the left or … Continue reading

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Training Rondel with Rondels

One of the issues that we’ve been running into is that our training daggers is that the lack of a rondel causes them to not behave like real daggers. With a real rondel, the rondels prevent you from straightening out … Continue reading

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Context Matters

Often missing in descriptions of techniques, both historic and modern, is context. This is a problem because context matters a lot. A technique that works brilliantly at one measure may fall apart one pace closer or farther apart. An attack … Continue reading

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