Meyer’s Longsword – Part 1, Divisions

Chapter 1: Divisions of the Combatant

Previous interpretation: Meyer’s Longsword – Divisions of the Combatant

Something I missed before was where Meyer mentions that it is now the fashion to primarily aim for the head. I think he is saying that since thrusting isn’t used, winding attacks from the bind to the head have become predominate.

This leads me to believe that earlier forms of German fencing concentrated more on attacks to the body. This would make sense given that a thrust to the body is more likely to strike true. That said, we are still talking about roughly the chest region, not the belly or legs.

Chapter 2: Divisions of the Sword

Previous interpretation: Meyer’s Longsword – Divisions of the Sword

I did a disservice to my readers and myself by not focusing on what the divisions of the sword are used for.

  • The first division of the sword is the hilt, pommel, and grip. This is used for: running in, grappling, wrestling, and casting.
  • The second division of the sword is the forte. It is used for slicing, winding, pressing, and similar things.
  • The third division or middle of the blade is used for… well anything that happens to come up.
  • The fourth division or foible is used for changing through, flicking, and slinging.

Though  easily overlooked, these divisions of the blade are vital for interpreting techniques from later chapters. Generally speaking, Meyer isn’t going to tell you which part of the blade to use for a given action.

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