Marozzo’s Greatsword – True Edge Stretta 1

Marozzo’s third assault for the great sword (literally megia spada or mega sword) consists of roughly 20 plays from the bind. The first 13 are binds on the left, which are referred to as true edge on true edge in the Bolognese manuals.

The first true edge stretta is a disarm with a passing step. For this and the plays that follow I will be using the Craig Pitt-Pladdy translation.

Now note that being engaged at the said megia spada with the enemy, that is true-edge with true-edge, you will throw your left hand near the elcetto [lugs] in fact and you take all two swords together with your said left hand , and the right you will thrust it toward the enemy, that is for the right of the handle of his sword, and that you will take with your right hand, taking strongly with the big finger of your right hand the handle of your sword, and with the other’s you will take the said handle of the above said; and here you will clasp them together with the said right hand, and the left seizes strongly above, in a way that you will give him a strike on his right hand and it will be needed that he lets go of the sword to such effect. But watch well that when you will go to make the said hold, it is necessary that you pass strongly with your leg left leg advanced for the right of the enemy.

Video

There isn’t much to explain here so here’s a video.

Other Sources

This play reminds me of Wallerstein 21v, but I prefer Marozzo’s conclusion.

image

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6 Responses to Marozzo’s Greatsword – True Edge Stretta 1

  1. marozzo says:

    A mega sword? Come on, meza spada means “half sword” and refers to the position of crossed swords. This is part of the 101 of Italian historical swordsmanship knowledge.

  2. Yeah Ilkka is right. “megia” is just a dialectal variant of “mezza”, nothing to do with “mega”.

    Marozzo also uses the expression “megia volte di pugno”, and he’s not talking about a mega turn of the hand.

  3. Pingback: Scholars of Alcala Class Notes – May 1, 2016 | Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

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