Montante vs Rivero Ridoppio

A question that often comes up is “Why is the Montante not just called a Rivero Ridoppio?”. The answer to that has eluded me for awhile, but now that I see it, it seems so obvious.

Another question comes from this passage in Marozzo,

What is mandritto tondo, mandritto fendente, mandritto sgualembrato, mandritto redoppio, and falso dritto and montante and you know that from this begins all these attacks. And from the left demonstrate roverso tondo and roverso sgualembrato, roverso fendente, and roverso redoppio, and false manco, and falso, and dritto, and falso roverso; which in principle you will give them meaning. And of what is dritto and roverso, making every one against said segno.

Why is the montante listed among the cuts from the right, if the blade cuts from the left?

Both questions can be settled with the same answer.

When asked to perform a Rivero Ridoppio, most fencers will bring their hand to the left side of their body before performing the cut itself. But when performing the Montante, the hand starts just right of the center line.

  • Why is the Montante not just called a Rivero Ridoppio? Because the hand stays on the right.
  • Why is the montante listed among the cuts from the right, if the blade cuts from the left? Because the hand stays on the right.
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