Nachreisen and Tempi for Attack

The Bolognese author dall’Agocchie says that “There are five ways of recognizing this tempo of attacking.”

  • The first one is that once you’ve parried your enemy’s blow, then it’s a tempo to attack. 
  • The second, when his blow has passed outside your body, that’s a tempo to follow it with the most convenient response. 
  • The third, when he raises his sword to harm you: while he raises his hand, that’s the tempo to attack. 
  • The fourth, as he injudiciously moves from one guard to go into another, before he’s fixed in that one, then it’s a tempo to harm him. 
  • The fifth and last, when the enemy is fixed in guard, and he raises or moves his forward foot in order to change pace or approach you, while he raises his foot, that’s a tempo for attacking him, because he can’t harm you as a result of being unsettled.

Compare this to Meyer’s example of Nachreisen.

This is a particularly good handwork, and he who is very skillful in it and knows well how to use it may properly be praised as a master. And chasing is executed thus: if your opponent cuts with his weapon either too far up or down, or too far out to the side, then you rush after him at his opening and thus prevent his cut coming to completion; for this may properly be used against those who fight with their cuts sweeping wide around them. So that you may better understand this, I will explain it for you with this example:

When an opponent is fighting with you, then observe in which part he holds his sword. Now if he holds it in the right Ox, that is in the upper right quarter, then the moment he takes his sword away from there to change to the other side, or simply pulls up for the stroke, you shall cut in quickly and skillfully, using those cuts and techniques from which you can at once achieve a parry.

Now if he attacks from the lower guards (whether he fights from the left or right side), then as soon as he goes up, see that you pursue him at once under his sword skillfully with the long edge and strike to the nearest opening.

Pairing them up:

  • Second reason: if your opponent cuts with his weapon either too far up or down, or too far out to the side
  • Fourth reason: then the moment he takes his sword away from there to change to the other side,
  • Third reason: or simply pulls up for the stroke
  • Third reason: Now if he attacks from the lower guards (whether he fights from the left or right side), then as soon as he goes up,

So while the “tempi for attack” are a broader concept than Nachreisen, one can be used to explain the other from a different viewpoint.

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