Fabris – Drills for Plate 22

Prior to attempting these drills you should be familiar with the drills on plate 21.

Plate 22 – Fabris 1a

  • Both fencers start in 3rd on the inside.
  • The agent constrains the patient by turning the wrist into second
  • Patient doesn’t react [If he does react, see plate 23]
  • The agent performs a straight feint, rotating his hand clockwise and extending the shoulder and body.
  • Patient doesn’t react [If he does react, see below]
  • The agent continues forward, rotating the into fourth and stepping as necessary as per illustration 21.

The constraint isn’t mentioned on this page. You need to go back to the previous page, where it says that,

If you want the feint to be successful, either wait for a movement of the opponent or first find his sword so as to render him incapable of using that line to attack you.

    Failure to do this gives us Plate 21, Fabris Fencer 1 where in the patient wins.

    image_thumb[2]

    Plate 22 – Fabris 1b

    This is an improved version of Plate 21, Common Fencer 1b.

      • Both fencers start in 3rd on the inside.
      • The agent constrains the patient by turning the wrist into second
      • Patient doesn’t react
      • The agent performs a straight feint, rotating his hand clockwise and extending the shoulder and body.
      • Patient parries
      • The agent drops his tip to disengage and avoid blade contact, raises it on the other side, and thrusts in 3rd over the arm, stepping as necessary, as per illustration 22.

      During this drill the agent must continually move forward with his arm, then shoulder, then body, and finally with his foot throughout the feint, disengage, and subsequent attack. If there is any hesitation, as if performing distinct actions rather than one fluid motion, the attack can be interrupted.

      For the disengage itself, it is not always necessary to agent move the sword swideways. The patients parry will move his sword to the other side, so the agent merely has to concentrate on dropping and raising the point.

      Loosening the hand in order to drop the point is preferable to bending the wrist. Especially when in the extended 3rd, where in you only have to drop a very small distance.

      image_thumb[1]

      Plate 22 – Common Fencer 2

      • Both fencers start in 3rd on the inside.
      • The agent constrains the patient by turning the wrist into second
      • The patient disengages to the outside with a step
      • The patient thrusts in 3rd over the arm

      Plate 22 – Fabris 2

      • Both fencers start in 3rd on the inside.
      • The agent constrains the patient by turning the wrist into second
      • The patient disengages to the outside with a step
      • The agent counters with a straight thrust in third over the arm as shown in illustration 22.

      Timing: The agent starts his counter-thrust as soon as the patient’s point crosses the vertical plane formed by the agent’s quillon. Any sooner and you’ll be on the wrong side, any later and you may not have enough time.

      Advertisements
      This entry was posted in Fabris, Rapier and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

      One Response to Fabris – Drills for Plate 22

      1. Pingback: Fabris – Drills for Plate 23 | Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

      Leave a Reply

      Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

      WordPress.com Logo

      You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

      Twitter picture

      You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

      Facebook photo

      You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

      Google+ photo

      You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

      Connecting to %s