Author Archives: Grauenwolf

Meyer: Rethinking Footwork

In longsword chapter 10, there’s an exercise informally known as Meyer’s Cross. (Or “Meyer’s Square” for those people who don’t know what a square looks like.) The default footwork for this is alternating passing steps to the left and right. … Continue reading

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L’Ange: Changing our Rapier Footwork

Up until now we used this footwork pattern for obtaining a constraint. (Only the right foot is shown.) 1: Patient stands in guard of Tertia. The Agent stands in Quarta on the inside. Start far enough apart that the swords … Continue reading

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Practice Notes for Sunday, Dec 15, 2019

We covered a lot of material in Sunday’s rapier class. For your benefit, I’ve taken the time to writing up some notes and posting them in our new website. https://hemadrillbook.azurewebsites.net/b/L’Ange/p/Main/t/commentary The new sections are: Chapter 4: How You Shall Recognize … Continue reading

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New Gorget Done

It only took me a decade to get off my ass and finish strapping this, but we’ve got one more gorget for the loaner kit.

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Antique Sparring Longsword

There are only a couple dozen antique sparring longswords left in the world. This is one of the three that are in North America. Source:

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Is the edge or back of a blade stronger?

Well of course it depends on the blade. But if we’re talking about Japanese swords, we have an excellent source with both historic and scientific information. Just to make things interesting, let me translate an account by another Japanese swordsman. … Continue reading

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Blacksmiths Slate

When making something to a specific size, you often have to follow a pattern. But a normal paper pattern will catch on fire. So you need a slate. Any piece of rusty sheet metal 10-12″ a side will work for … Continue reading

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