Tag Archives: guards

Meyer’s Pike – Equipment, Guards, and a Basic Drill

The hardest part about studying pike is actually finding a pike. During Meyer’s time, the late 16th century, a typical pike would range from 15 to 22 feet long. Even if something that long could be found, transporting it would … Continue reading

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Johannes Georgius Bruchius – Introduction and Guards

Printed in 1671, the primary purpose of Bruchius’ book is to make the Italian tradition widely available to Low German (i.e. Dutch) speakers. By the time Bruchius was published, the French version of Thibault was already 43 years old. Though … Continue reading

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Joseph Swetnam’s Quarterstaff Guards

Yesterday we looked at Meyer’s Quarterstaff guards. Today we take a peek at Joseph Swetnam. I’m including this specifically because his two guards are not found in Meyer. High Guard Look under your Staff with both your eyes, with the … Continue reading

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Meyer’s Quarterstaff – Guards

According to Meyer, the quarterstaff is the basis of all long weapons. Oberhut – High Guard In the high guard position yourself thus: stand with your left foot forward, and hold your staff with the tail at your chest, so … Continue reading

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Camillo Agrippa – Chapter 1, The Four Guards

Agrippa is responsible for reducing the multitude of guards used in medieval fencing down to four numbered guards. While this was quite radical in 1553, by the time we get to the early 1600’s the old system of named guards … Continue reading

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Giovanni dall’Agocchie – High Guards

Next up is the high guards. Again, there are four primary guards and a few others mentioned in passing. Guardia d’alicorno: Unicorn guard, essentially prima/first Guardia di testa: Head guard, arm is well extended and online. Sword is angled diagonal … Continue reading

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Giovanni dall’Agocchie – Low Guards

Giovanni selects four low guards to focus on, but he does mention others. Coda lunga stretta: Sword outside the right side, right foot forward Coda lunga alta: Sword outside the right side, left foot forward Porta di ferro: Sword above … Continue reading

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